Posted tagged ‘beginning’

Art Lessons in Richmond & Surrey are Applelicious

February 16, 2015
This apple is painted quite fast with a wet on wet technique that will allow the different shades and tints and colours to blend into each other.

This apple is painted quite fast with a wet on wet technique that will allow the different shades and tints and colours to blend into each other.

More adult watercolour classes have been added to my schedule at the Thompson Community Centre in Richmond. If you are looking for some beginner instruction in the tricky medium of watercolour come join our class this spring. Each session we will try different projects such as learning to do washes using simple subjects such as fruit and misty mountain ranges, playing with negative space between fence posts, and scratching out highlights on sparkling seas and snow.

There are 3 new sessions at the Thompson Community Centre. Phone 604-238-8422 for info and to register. We meet on Mondays from 1:00 to 2:30. The next session is March 2 – 23. Then the other two are April 13 – May 11 and May 25 – June 22. Hope to see you there!

This green apple is in oil pastel, which is a little tricky to blend. Start with light strokes in a variety of colours and build up the layers.

This green apple is in oil pastel, which is a little tricky to blend. Start with light strokes in a variety of colours and build up the layers.

Here are some examples of the various apple studies I have taught in my watercolur, pastel, and pencil crayon classes for adults and children. I find that the apple lends itself well as a subject for beginners; it’s more interesting than just a circle and yet not so complex as to scare people away. The variety of colours found on apples are another plus as I always stress that a collection of colours is more interesting to the eye than a flat 1 colour subject (although that has its place too, such as in many poster designs and logos).

Soft, or chalk pastel was used on this apple and is much easier to blend than oil pastel.

Soft, or chalk pastel was used on this apple and is much easier to blend than oil pastel.

Whether it is watercolour, pastel, or pencil crayon, build up a layer of different colours, focusing on your main one, like red, but highlighting with ones such as yellows, and darkening with colours such as blues and purples. Start light, and work up the layers until you just do the dark areas at the end. Have fun, and experiment. Paint and draw apples over and over again, as using the same subject will let you see your progress over time.

This apple had each layer of watercolour dry before the next layer or colour was painted on top and thus you can see some of the brush strokes and it doesn't blend like the wet on wet apple shown above.

This apple had each layer of watercolour dry before the next layer or colour was painted on top and thus you can see some of the brush strokes and it doesn’t blend like the wet on wet apple shown above.

A study in value where you only use one pencil crayon. Can also be done with regular pencil. Try a 3 or 4B.

A study in value where you only use one pencil crayon. Can also be done with regular pencil. Try a 3 or 4B.

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Tiana’s Etsy Store is Now Open

November 30, 2013

Now you can buy original and printed art by me on my Etsy store Tiana Kaczor Fine Arts. There’s still time before Christmas to pick up a hand printed photograph or a miniature watercolour. Or if you live near Vancouver, B.C. (so we don’t have to rely on mailing times) there’s even time to commission a watercolour or drawing based on a photo of your choice.
Visit my store here:  

I’m still learning about the wonderful word of Etsy, researching how other artists and craftspeople list their wares, so it’s been a little slow for getting some of my art up for sale, but you will find a few items there now.
I’m listing a variety of mediums and styles in hopes of getting some feedback from window shoppers and buyers about what they’re interested in getting.  Prices range from around $10 to $400.
I will be uploading more artworks for sale in the next few weeks, so keep checking back for new stock. Original watercolour postcards and vintage computer art prints are next on my list for stocking my shelves.

Tiana Kaczor Fine Arts Etsy banner

Come take a look at my Etsy store

Beginners Watercolour Lesson – Form and Value

August 11, 2012

I don’t think I’ve ever posted and art lesson on my blog, but I realized the other day that there are a lot of people on the internet looking for instruction on the web, including myself. I often turn to the internet to search for lesson ideas, whether I use them directly, or indirectly when they spark an idea of my own. I’ve also learned a few things from my students this week and thought I would share that with people outside the classroom.

Cherries watercolour value notes

Cherries watercolour value notes

I’ve been teaching an adult watercolour class one evening a week, and this week also did 4 days in a row of a teen class and a pre-teen (9 to 12-year-old) class. I know there are many teachers (including myself) who believe in letting the creativity flow freely out of their students. Give them the materials, a subject, and let them go to it. However, I realized this week that direct, step by step instruction is often a better way for students to learn. This was highly evident when I worked on a First Nations reserve and we implemented a teacher directed reading program. Teacher does something and then the students copy it. My adult watercolour students this week said they learned more when I painted the steps and they followed along than when I just told them some tips and let them work through the process themselves.

For the 4 day week-long class for the children I broke the lessons down into 3 areas: colour, form and value, and texture and pattern. Here is the warm up for the form and value day:

Watercolour cherries– Perfect for this time in summer when the fruit is ripe, however I did not bring in real cherries but asked the students to paint from memory. Cherries are a basic circle that they can easily practice layering paint on to make the objects appear three dimensionally round.

Watercolour value notes from class painted examples.

Watercolour value notes from class painted examples.

1. Pencil draw 3 circles. Overlap one. Draw stems, straight lines that go a little into the top of the circles. Draw a “happy face smile” curve under the stem line for the top dimple on the cherry.

2. Mix some blue purple. Add lots of water to make it a light value. Paint loosely, and quickly inside the pencil drawn cherry using U shaped strokes, not straight strokes which would flatten the object. Leave a tiny dot or two of white paper showning – this is the shine on the cherry.

3. Repeat the painting step 3 to 4 more times, each time making the purple less watered down and thus darker. Paint further towards the edges of the cherry with each darker colour. Also remember where your light source is – one side of the cherry will be darker than the other. Letting the paint dry between each layer will keep the shades seperate. Painting the layers quickly while each is still wet will cause the shades to flow into each other. This can make smoother tansitions between the values, but can also be hard to control and if too wet the colours will run all over the place. Practice both ways.

After the cherries I let the students try other objects of their own choosing. They painted apples, oranges, grapes, cut watermelon… I was hungry for lunch and painted hamburgers and hot dogs! All levels from adult to child enjoyed this exercise. I had a teen who even practiced it the next day when she had some time near the end of the class. I also had a parent come to me and tell me how impressed they were with their child’s painted cherries.

If you try this exercise please let me know how it went and whether this quick lesson description gave enough detail. I also must give a credit of thanks to Alwyn Crawshaw, as a couple of his books gave me some help in planning this lesson.

Do You Suffer From Career Complacency?

June 5, 2012

Last week, Mike, a fellow musician, posted a link to a podcast that talked about career complacency. I’m not one to spend a half hour listening to something online, but I did this time, and I went further to find where the text version was (by Scott Dinsmore), and to see the trailer for a film being made on the subject (“I’m Fine, Thanks”). I encourage everyone who has ever had the thought “I wish I were doing something I love,” or “I wish I could be an artist, musician, dancer, architect, astronaut …” to go and check out these sites.

What is true to your heart? What gives you a creative high? Don’t be content to just float through life, spread your wings and soar! What an amazing world this would be if we all decided to try our best to live our dreams instead of just doing what others tell us is practical and realistic. It’s hard to get out of our daily routine, but I would like to try. How about you?

Here are the sites:  http://liveyourlegend.net/   Read the post:

How Complacency Killed the College Graduate (& the American Dream) + What YOU Can Do

Then go to this site to see the trailer, and maybe donate, to the feature length documentary about complacency called “I’m Fine, Thanks”  http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cranktank/im-fine-thanks

 

Painted Terracotta Army Unveiled

April 25, 2012
Terracotta Warriors Unveiling Tiana Front

Terracotta Warriors Unveiling. Tiana in front of "Wu Chang".

The rain stayed away and I had a lovely morning in downtown Vancouver with family and friends at the official unveiling of 29 painted Terracotta Warriors. They looked a little scary at first, all covered in black drapes, but as the artists and our sponsors pulled off the covers the army emerged in full colour. It was great to see the statues in formation, and have the chance to view the artists hard work in one location, before they are distributed around the city. Maps are available from the BC Lions Society for Children With Disabilites to help you find the warriors around town over the next few months.

I love having the opportunity to talk with people as they are looking at my art, to explain my process and ideas, and receive their comments and praise. There was a lot of press there yesterday as well. I was photographed several times and had an interview with The Epoch Times.  Here are some links I’ve found so far:

The Vancouver Sun – article, video, and photos:  http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Terracotta+army+Vancouver+streets/6512586/story.html?tab=PHOT

24 Hours Vancouver – article, map, and photos. Go to the gallery for all the photos. I’m in the first one with the little girl. I’m in the back wearing a black coat. Several photos show my warrior “Wu Chang”. Not full on but he’s there! Dad got in a photo too!  : http://vancouver.24hrs.ca/News/local/2012/04/24/19674136.html

Terracotta Warriors Unveiling. Tiana and the back side of "Wu Chang".

Terracotta Warriors Unveiling. Tiana and the back side of "Wu Chang".

Painting for Process Not Product

August 25, 2010
Blue Bow, by Tiana, 2010

Blue Bow, watercolour and ink, 4"x6", Tiana 2010

It’s hard to distance oneself from our money driven society, from those unsaid rules that adults cannot play like we did when we were children, but must produce products that will pay our bills. I’ll admit that I have been stuck in this predicament. When your day gets clogged with chores who has time to play just for fun? Lately I have been trying to get back a little of that play time for myself, whether its dragon boating, digging in my garden, or improvising on the piano. For some reason my visual art is a little slower to return to a playful state. In my early 20s I was churning out all sorts of art experiments from collages on recipe cards, to drawing mazes, to making paper pulp and forming it into masks, to writing poetry out of random words cut from magazines. The last few years my art production has focused on examples for teaching, commissions, and a few pieces for shows. Since I don’t have a full time job now, I’ve got the time for fun, for experimentation.  But why, as an adult, is it so hard to let oneself play?

This painting of a boat in Steveston is a quick piece (4 to 5 hours) I did this week. Unfortunately I cannot report that it was done just for fun. There is a call for artists for Richmond’s Cultural Days and that’s what helped me get my paints out. However, it’s creation has spurred me into creative thoughts and hopefully into some fun creative production. Oh to be more carefree and create for the enjoyment of the process instead of always thinking of income potential.

Let’s Begin. 1,2,3…GO!

July 20, 2008

The road to fame begins, the quest has started, we’ve unleashed the hounds, the horses are out of the gate,  the countdown has commenced, I’ve started the engine, now give it some gas, and we’ll be off and running!

Welcome to Tiana Kaczor Fine Arts

This is a place to connect to the creativity that flows out of me. Whether you have come by just to observe, or you plan to purchase, all are welcome. Without you I would be nothing. Well, not nothing, but a lot less. I tend to feed off of others. That’s often where the best creations start. So inspire me with your comments, your project ideas, your links to others. In return I promise to give you the best that I’ve got. Let us learn from one another, create together, and build a path to … well I’m not sure, because we haven’t got there yet, but let’s hope it’s a fun journey.

Artists draw from all areas of life to find inspiration for their creations. In this blog you will not only find information about my specific creative activities in visual art and music, but you will also find comments about anything in my life that I feel will be of interest to others. Politics, literature, entertainment, anything that I come across is fair game.

Every week something new to exhibit, share, sell, or discuss. I hope you will visit me often, and tell your friends! To start off I’ll give you a maze. It seems fitting now to go back to mazes. I have drawn them during times of change in my life. Perhaps I am looking for a new direction, a new path. I have a feeling this will be an exciting one. Am I ready? You bet! 1, 2, 3 . . . GO!

10"x16" ink on paper, 1993

Stars and the City 10"x16" ink on paper, 1993